25.2 C
Accra
Tuesday, September 21, 2021
No menu items!

A Book titled ‘Last Bath’ launched in Accra

Must Read

“Hasten SDGs implementation to build fairer, prosperous world” – President Akufo-Addo

The President of Ghana and Co-Chair of the Group of Eminent Advocates of the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development...

Eliminating “schools under trees” and related problems in Ghana: Where is the communal spirit for development?

By Simon Mariwah, PhD Introduction The phenomenon of “schools under trees” has become a social problem and a propagandist political tool...

Hotel Rwanda hero convicted on terror charges

A man who was portrayed in a film as a life-saving hero during the Rwandan genocide has been sentenced...

A book, titled, ‘Last Bath’, a pictorial presentation of the inhumane treatment meted out to victims of the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade, has been launched, in Accra, with a call on government and stakeholders, in education, to include books on African history in the country’s curriculum.

The Founding President of the Pan-African Museum, Mr. Kojo Yankah, made the call, adding that African history will give pupils and students the opportunity to acquire a broader understanding of their root.

About 50 kilometers north of Cape Coast, is Okyin River, in Assin Manso.

In this river, then a stream, slaves, transported from the Northern part of Ghana, were made to take their last bath, before they proceeded to the Cape Coast and Elmina Castles, for shipment to Europe.

The zeal and interest of Mr. Jeffery and Shaakira Edison, to visit such slave trade centres, encouraged them to document their experiences into a book – the ‘Last Bath’.

The forty-page book uses words, pictures and symbols to tell the historical reality and symbolism of the last bath, and the story of slavery, from the African perspective, depicting the emotions and knowledge that goes with the narrative.

The authors, Mr.& Mrs. Edison, said their visits to the slave dungeons made them imagine the experiences of their ancestors during the slave trade days, as though they were there too.

The Founding president of the Pan-African Museum, Mr. Kojo Yankah, and other guests, who graced the occasion suggested that books that relate to the history of Africa and its people are made available in schools, as well as to the larger public, for them to be acquainted with their history.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

“Hasten SDGs implementation to build fairer, prosperous world” – President Akufo-Addo

The President of Ghana and Co-Chair of the Group of Eminent Advocates of the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development...

Eliminating “schools under trees” and related problems in Ghana: Where is the communal spirit for development?

By Simon Mariwah, PhD Introduction The phenomenon of “schools under trees” has become a social problem and a propagandist political tool for all political parties in...

Hotel Rwanda hero convicted on terror charges

A man who was portrayed in a film as a life-saving hero during the Rwandan genocide has been sentenced to 25 years for terrorism...

Police beef up to curtail agitations over MMDCE nominations

By Nathaniel Nartey. Facebook: Nathaniel Nartey Twitter: @Annertey_Nartey The Police Administration has deployed personnel nationwide to curb any disturbances that may arise following the release of the...

2-year contract for Serbian Milovan Rajevac as Black Stars Coach

By Benjamin Willie Graham. The Ghana Football Association (GFA), is reported to have agreed to a 2-year contract with Serbian Coach, Milovan Rajevac as he...

More Articles Like This